Author Archive: Genevieve Allen Hearn

Library Notes

Library Notes By Angela J. Reynolds, Community Engagement Coordinator, Annapolis Valley Regional Library As we gear up for Fall storytime season, music comes to mind. After all, what would storytime be without music? Of course we share lots of books at storytime, but we also love our songs and rhymes. We know that kids love music, that we humans enjoy a good sing-along. We start with the babies — Windsor and Wolfville offer Babies & Books storytimes, and in Berwick, storytime starts with toddlers. Tuesdays in Wolfville means Book in the Nook, with stories and songs, often with Troubador Lisa playing…
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In With the New: Locally Owned Businesses Sprouting Up Across the Valley! (Part 2)

In With the New: Locally Owned Businesses Sprouting Up Across the Valley! By Genevieve Allen Hearn As a continuation from the last issue, here are more local businesses that will be appearing soon in a neighbourhood near you! Schoolhouse Brewery
 Location: 40 Water Street, Windsor (behind T.A.N. Coffee) Open date: They hope to open the retail shop by December and the Taproom by next Spring. What will you offer? Cameron Hartley: Although we have loved having the title “Nova Scotia’s smallest craft brewery”, it has many challenges. For the past year we have been at our maximum production of 300litres/week…
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What’s Growing in the Harriet Irving Botanical Gardens: Music from the Acadian Forest!

What’s Growing in the Harriet Irving Botanical Gardens: Music from the Acadian Forest! By Adrien Greene While working in the gardens we are constantly reminded of our incredible dependence upon plants. Not only do plants provide oxygen, food, shelter and medicine for us, they provide the material needed to build beautiful musical instruments! Around the world, humans have used seed pods, reeds, branches, stems, bark, gourds and beyond to develop an amazing variety of instruments. Within the Acadian Forest Region, in the small town of LaPatrie, Québec, the luthiers of Seagull Guitars craft exquisite guitars, mandolins and merlins. All of…
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Who’s Who: Ray Savage – The Excelr8r

Who’s Who: Ray Savage – The Excelr8r By Mike Butler I love writing this column…I get to meet, interact, and then profile wonderful members of our community. I’ve had the pleasure of profiling authors, painters, teachers, actors, chefs, business owners, and many more. I usually fly by the seat of my pants to find subjects but lately, the fine folks featured in this column have come from strong recommendations, and that is how Ray Savage surfaced. Ray has an immeasurable history of involvement in his community and I’m so pleased to profile him. Ray Savage was born and raised in…
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School News

School News The Wolfville School Renovation project is moving along, but it looks like they need just one more day to get it just right for the returning students this year. The school will open one day later than expected, now scheduled for Thursday, September 8. According to Principal Steve Keddy, “Phase 1 of the project is near completion. This work involved renovating the elementary wing and an addition of three classrooms. School will start in September in this part of the building. Phase 2 has commenced with the demolishing of the old Junior wings with the only space remaining…
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In With the New: Locally Owned Businesses Sprouting Up Across the Valley! (Part 1)

In With the New: Locally Owned Businesses Sprouting Up Across the Valley! (Part 1) By Genevieve Allen Hearn A number of popular local haunts have closed recently, including Designer Café in Kentville and Il Dolce Café in Wolfville. Losing such businesses can be a tough pill to swallow – especially in a rural area where the absence of a community gathering point makes a major impact on the lives of local residents. However, the sadness that we feel about losing these businesses is assuaged by the excitement of new emergent businesses and business expansions! The Grapevine spoke with a few…
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Save Cinematopia

Save Cinematopia By Megan Halliburton Six and a half years ago, a dream came true for me. On a frigid January day in 2010, I opened the doors of my very own video store, Cinematopia, in Wolfville. It had been a labour of love getting the place off the ground, with a lot of hard work and a whole lot of help from fellow movie-lovers and local movers and shakers. What had started as an attempt to save Light and Shadow, the grand old institution started by the inimitable Bob Brown in 1989, ended up as the beginning of a…
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What’s growing at the Harriet Irving Botanical Gardens: Beyond Blossoms

What’s growing at the Harriet Irving Botanical Gardens: Beyond Blossoms By Melanie Priesnitz The next time you visit a garden, I invite you to ignore all of the pretty flowers and try to focus on observing the diversity and beauty of plants beyond their blooms. As a beautiful human is so much more than a pretty face, plants hold great allure beyond their blossoms. If you look deeply into a garden you’ll see a myriad of interesting textures, shapes, sizes, and patterns. The plant world is a vastly diverse one, which is easy to see for yourself when you start…
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Perseverance At The Box Of Delights Bookshop

Perseverance At The Box Of Delights Bookshop By Benjamin Bush Anderson As thousands of students drag their heels back through school halls, we prepare for the inevitable wave of young folk flocking our shelves for the books being forced upon them. Pluck up, dear despondent scholar, for our books don’t bite and only long ago possessed bark. One such a book that may be assigned to such a student is Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea. Now a classroom staple, the Pulitzer Prize winning novella was first published in Life Magazine on September 1, 1952. For all you students looking…
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The Dome Chronicles: The Dam

The Dome Chronicles: The Dam By Garry Leeson In 1972, a boxcar from Toronto containing a menagerie of farm animals and an eager young couple pulled into the station platform in Kingston, Nova Scotia. They were bound for a deserted hundred-acre farm on the South Mountain, determined to preserve the foundations of farmsteads past while constructing a geodesic dome. They were pioneers of the future, armed with respect for tradition and an irrepressible sense of humour. They didn’t call themselves farmers. They were back-to-the-landers. Farming was industry and their calling was sustainability. Over the next forty years, through flood and…
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