Categories
Film & Media Give Look

Wolfville’s Al Whittle Theatre Needs Love

Wendy Elliott

The Al Whittle Theatre in Wolfville is very much alive, even though there have been no public performances and almost zero income for the past 12 months.
Fortunately there have been some private rentals and support from the provincial government, so Mary Harwell, manager of Wolfville’s cultural hub, says, “we’re not in danger, but revenues are down a lot.”

An emergency funding grant of $19,715 will help the facility to continue to host concerts, film screenings, live theatre, and festivals once pandemic restrictions ease. The cinema had a program of improvements underway, Harwell noted, but refurbishing of brickwork on the 120-year-old building has been somewhat delayed. “We’re keeping things going,” she said. An Oscar-based film series of 11 screenings is set to start on April 4 with social distancing. The Valentine’s weekend of films was popular.

Co-op president Frank Lussing says the board has been using its meetings to “look forward post-pandemic and be aware of changing factors to determine what kind of future we want to have.”

One of the key changes was suggested by performers, he said, “who are looking for opportunities to expand their audiences virtually. There will never be a substitute for live audiences, but due to the pandemic there is more interest in that experience.”

As a result, some of the funds raised in the annual share sale campaign will go toward the purchase of live-streaming equipment. Since the Nova Scotia government has ended the Equity Tax Credit program for cooperatives, $100 shares can be purchased at any time of the year, says secretary Elisabeth Kosters.

The theatre is a provincially-designated landmark dating back to 1901. In 1947, the re-named Acadia Theatre showed its first film. After a period of closure twenty years ago, the newly-renovated, community-owned theatre reopened in 2004. The building is called the Acadia Cinema, but the theatre was named after long-time manager, the late Al Whittle.

Community volunteers and co-op shareholders were able to pay off the mortgage on the cinema in 2019. The cinema board includes Frank Lussing, President; Lesley Winters, Vice-President; Elisabeth Kosters, Secretary; Trevor Lloyd, Treasurer; Vincent den Hartog, Alyson Kelly, Graham Howes, Lynn Aylward, and Deborah Hemming.

Photo courtesy of Wendy Elliott.

Categories
Film & Media

Farewell Al Whittle!

Wendy Elliott

In 1953, Al Whittle became the youngest theatre manager in Canada when he took over the reins at the Acadia Cinema. On January 23, Al died at the age of 91.

Admission to the theatre at that time was 35¢, with 10¢ matinees. The theatre was eventually renovated, increasing its seat capacity to 630 and then expanding from a single to a triple screen experience. Al was involved in every aspect of the theatre’s operations, from taking tickets and making popcorn to choosing the films and providing technical assistance for the projector.
Thinking back to his first adventures in Wolfville, he used to say, he was amazed. The downtown back in the 1950s boasted four gas stations and four grocery stores. It was booming, Al said. “Anything you wanted, it was in Wolfville. There were no bars or lounges, so the place for entertainment was the theatre.”

The Acadia neon marquee, installed in the late 40’s, has become an icon for Wolfville – just as Al was. He once recalled obliging visiting photographers by turning the neon lights on for nighttime shoots.

Al spent his career managing the cinema up until his retirement in 2000. The Spencer family waited until his retirement and put the theatre up for sale.
He became an active volunteer in the community-based drive to maintain the old theatre. In 2002, the Acadia Cinema Co-op, in partnership with Just Us! Coffee Roasters, purchased the building on condition it be named the Al Whittle Theatre. Renovations turned it into a comfortable 160-seat venue, which re-opening its doors in 2004, when the neon marquee was re-lit.

There was a 2013 gala celebration of his contribution to the cultural life of the Annapolis Valley that featured a screening of the 1953 hit musical Gentlemen Prefer Blondes with Marilyn Monroe—one of Al’s favourite flicks.

Al also spent 55 years as the front man at the Acadia University dining halls, meeting generations of students. No wonder the town and Acadia University lowered their flags to half-mast on the news of his death.

This photo taken from Al’s collection shows him with a student employee in the projection booth circa 1975.

Categories
Articles Events Film & Media Look

BEA Atlantic Film Series Presents City Dreamers in Wolfville

BEA Atlantic Film Series Presents City Dreamers in Wolfville
Submitted

Building Equality in Architecture Atlantic (BEA Atlantic) is proud to present the second feature in its film series which debuted in May 2019. The BEAA Film Series aims to bring films relevant to the architecture and design disciplines to Atlantic Canada, with a particular focus on the roles that women and other underrepresented groups have played in shaping the design professions.

The film being presented for the October feature is City Dreamers, a film by Joseph Hillel, Maison 4:3 and Couzin Films. In City Dreamers we meet Phyllis Lambert, Blanche Lemco van Ginkel, Cornelia Hahn Oberlander, and Denise Scott Brown, four trailblazers who became accustomed to being the only woman in the room. Each has an extensive list of accomplishments in architecture, planning, and landscape architecture dating back over 60 years, and has taught, mentored, and inspired generations of professionals. How have they envisioned our cities?

Through original interviews, archival material and stunning cinematography, documentary filmmaker Joseph Hillel uncovers how each of these strong, independent thinkers has shaped the cities we live and work in. As the world becomes increasingly urbanized, the insights of these forward-looking women who have built social and environmental values into their work seem more relevant now than ever.

City Dreamers will be screened on October 10, at 7:00pm at the Al Whittle Theatre in Wolfville. All are welcome to attend. Tickets are available on Eventbrite. See beaatlantic.com for further details.

BEA Atlantic looks forward to having you join us as we chart our journey – getting there from here

Categories
Articles Best Of Events Film & Media Listen Look

FESTIVAL GUIDE 2019

FESTIVAL GUIDE 2019

May 9-10
MAYWORKS FESTIVAL
Wolfville
donnaholmes712@gmail.com

May 29 – June 3
ANNAPOLIS VALLEY APPLE BLOSSOM FESTIVAL
The Valley, NS
appleblossom.com

June 7-8
PORT WILLIAMS DAYS
Port Williams, NS
portwilliams.com

June 13 – 16
ROOTS TO BOOTS FESTIVAL
Louisbourg & Chéticamp, NS
festivalracinesetbottines.ca
rootstobootsfestival.ca

June 15 -16
DEVIL’S HALF ACRE MOTORCYCLE EVENT
Kentville, NS
devilshalfacremotorcyclerally.ca

JUNE 21-23
FULL CIRCLE FESTIVAL & SUMMER SOLSTICE POP-UP MARKET
Newport Landing, NS
fullcirclefestival.ca

June 22
KENTVILLE CHALK AND ART FESTIVAL
Kentville, NS
kentville.ca

June 22
TEDDY BEAR JAMBOREE
Falmouth, NS
falmouthcommunityhall@gmail.com

June 22 – 23
KINGSPORT GALA DAYS
Kingsport, NS
facebook.com/kingsportgaladays

June 27 – June 30
FOX MOUNTAIN BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL
Aylesford, NS
foxmountaincampingpark.com

July 3 -15
PEGGY’S COVE AREA FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS
South Shore of NS
peggyscoveareafestivalofthearts.com

July 5 – 6
MARITIME METAL & HARD ROCK FESTIVAL
Windsor, NS
maritimemetalfest.com

July 5 – 6
SMOKIN’ BLUES FEST
Windsor, NS
smokinbluesfest.ca

July 5-7
LOBSTER BASH
Digby, NS
lobsterbash.blogspot.ca

July 7 -14
ANTIGONISH HIGHLAND GAMES
Antigonish, NS
antigonishhighlandgames.ca

July 9 – 14
HALIFAX JAZZ FESTIVAL
Halifax, NS
halifaxjazzfestival.ca

July 11 – 14
KINGSTON STEER BBQ
Kingston, NS
kingstonnovascotia.ca/steerbbq.htm

July 12-14
BRITISH MOTORING FESTIVAL
Windsor, NS
britishmotoringfestival.com

July 12 – 21
SCOTIA DAYS FESTIVAL
Mulgrave, NS
facebook.com/ScotiaDaysFestival

July 18-21
15TH ANNUAL ACOUSTIC MARITIME MUSIC FESTIVAL
Kempt Shore, NS
kemptshorefestivals.com

July 19-20
HEART OF THE VALLEY FESTIVAL
Middleton, NS
hotvf.ca

July 20
BEAR RIVER CHERRY CARNIVAL
Bear River, NS
Facebook: Bear River Cherry Carnival

July 20
HANTSPORT MUSIC FESTIVAL
Hantsport, NS
hhmf.ca

July 20-21
SEA TO SHORE SEA GLASS FESTIVAL
Berwick, NS
facebook: Ocean Zn Giftshop Mobile Boutique

July 25 – 28
48th ANNUAL NOVA SCOTIA BLUEGRASS & OLD-TIME MUSIC FESTIVAL
Bible Hill, NS
downeastgrass.com/annual-nova-scotia-festival.html

July 25-28
STAN ROGERS FOLK FESTIVAL
Canso, NS.
stanfest.com

July 26-28
MUDCREEK DAYS
Wolfville, NS
wolfville.ca

July 27
PORT GEORGE COUNTRY JAMBOREE
Port George, NS
countryjamboree.ca

JULY 27
WHARF DAY
Newport Landing, NS
avonriverheritage.com

July 27
10th ANNUAL ARTFESTIVAL WOLFVILLE
Wolfville, NS
facebook: Evangeline Artists’ Coop
Jean_leung@hotmail.com

July 31-Aug 5
HALIFAX BUSKER FESTIVAL
Halifax, NS
info@pegentertainment.ca

August 1-4
FOX MOUNTAIN COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL
Aylesford, NS
foxmountaincampingpark.com

August 1-4
BREAKING WAVES MUSIC AND FILM FESTIVAL
Freeport, NS
breakingwavesfestival.ca

August 2-4
AVON RIVER DAYS
Windsor, NS
avonriverdays.com

August 2-4
ANNAPOLIS ROYAL NATAL DAYS
Annapolis Royal, NS
annapolisroyal.com

August 4
29th NOVA SCOTIA FOLK ART FESTIVAL
Lunenburg, NS
nsfolkartfestival.com

August 8-11
DIGBY SCALLOP DAYS FESTIVAL
Digby, NS
digbyscallopdays.ca

August 10
MOONLIGHT CONCERT IN PARADISE
Paradise, NS
moonlightconcert.wixsite.com/moonlightconcert

August 11
VALLEY YOGA FEST
Kentville, NS
valleyyogafest.weebly.com/

August 12-17
ANNAPOLIS VALLEY EXHIBITION
Lawrencetown, NS
annapolisvalleyexhibition.com

August 17-18
PAINT THE TOWN
Annapolis Royal, NS
facebook.com/paintthetownannapolis

August 23-25
PICKERS & SONGWRITERS CAMPOUT
Kempt Shore, NS
kemptshorefestivals.com

August 24
KENTVILLE MULTICULTURAL FAIR
Kentville, NS
kdcl.ca/category/news-events/

Aug 25-Sept 1
HALIFAX URBAN FOLK FESTIVAL
Halifax, NS
halifaxurbanfolkfestival.com

August 28–September 1
WHARF RAT RALLY
Digby, NS
wharfratrally.com

August 28-September 2
BERWICK GALA DAYS
Berwick, NS
berwickgaladays.ca

Aug 29-Sept 8
HALIFAX FRINGE FESTIVAL
atlanticfringe.ca / 902-223-3873

September 12-15
BRIDGETOWN CIDERFEST
Bridgetown, NS
bridgetownciderfest.com

September 12-19
36th ANNUAL ATLANTIC FILM FESTIVAL
Halifax, NS
atlanticfilm.com

September 13-15 & 20-22
HANTS COUNTY EXHIBITION
Windsor, NS
hantscountyex.com

September 14
HONEY HARVEST FESTIVAL
Newport Landing, NS
avonriverheritage.com

September 19-22
LUNENBURG DOC FEST
Lunenburg, NS
LunenburgDocFest.com

September 21
NORTH ALONG THE SHORE JAMBOREE
Newport Landing, NS
thebasinbrothers.com

September 21
AVONDALE GARLIC FESTIVAL
Newport Landing, NS
avondalegarlicfest.com

September 26-29
DEEP ROOTS MUSIC FESTIVAL
Wolfville, NS
deeprootsmusic.ca

September 27-29
CULTURE DAYS
Newport Landing/Avondale
avonriverheritage.com

October 4-5
HALIFAX OYSTER FESTIVAL
Halifax, NS
oysterfest.ca

October 4-6
SHAG HARBOUR INCIDENT SOCIETY UFO FESTIVAL
Shag Harbour, NS
shagharbourincident.com

October 5-27
PUMPKIN PEOPLE FESTIVAL
Kentville, NS
kentville.ca

October 5
HARVEST FESTIVAL
Kentville, NS
kentville.ca

October 13
PUMPKIN REGATTA FESTIVAL
Windsor, NS
worldsbiggestpumpkins.com

_

October 17-19
NOCTURNE
Halifax, NS
nocturnehalifax.ca

October 22-27
DEVOUR! THE FOOD FILM FESTIVAL
Wolfville, NS
devourfest.com

Oct 23-26
HALIFAX POP EXPLOSION
halifaxpopexplosion.com

Categories
Articles Events Film & Media Look

Damage to the Iconic Acadia Cinema Marquee

Damage to the Iconic Acadia Cinema Marquee
By Wendy Elliott

Vandals have struck the neon tubing on the iconic Acadia Cinema marquee in Wolfville nine times since 2012.

The latest damage took place on a Sunday evening in February while a movie was being screened inside. The Wolfville Volunteer Fire Department were concerned about fire since the broken tubes were causing electrical arcing.

Vandals, who likely jump up and yank at the tubes, have caused the non-profit cinema co-operative nearly $5,000 in unnecessary repairs. Chris Siefert, who is one of the last artisans in Nova Scotia who can repair neon signage, calls the cinema marquee the icon of a dying art form. It may be the last of its kind in Nova Scotia. Certainly, Siefert says, the neon signs at the Oxford and Capitol Theatres in Halifax are gone. “I don’t know of any other marquees,” he says.

There is no doubt in his mind the damage is caused deliberately by vandals passing by. “For the tubes to be broken, they definitely have to be hit with something,” he said. “Either they’ve been batted at or someone has reached up and grabbed them.” Siefert adds, “that aggravates me. Some people say ‘oh it’s good for your business.’ But that’s not the way it should be. It’s a beautiful sign and the cinema is a heritage building now.”

The ‘Acadia’ neon marquee was installed in 1947 and quickly became an icon for Wolfville and today is a local landmark. “It’s a piece of history,” Siefert contends. “It’s seen so much.” Neon is not new technology and Siefert, with over 40 years under his belt, says he is one of the last repairmen in Nova Scotia – as is his colleague who is a tube bender. “The others got old. They retired or passed away and no one wanted to take it up.”

Contemplating the damage, Siefert notes, “you could say boys will be boys. But they don’t think about the ramifications. That marquee is going the way of the dinosaur. I wish they would understand that what they’re destroying eventually won’t be able to be replaced. It’s harder to get supplies and the suppliers are farther afield.”

Siefert, who comes up from the South Shore to make repairs, tries to keep repair costs down for the cinema coop. “I’ll try and keep it there a while long. I don’t want it to disappear on my watch.”

Cinema manager Mary Harwell says the board is “getting a quote to see if we could install a plexigass cover over the front stripes…in hopes of making it harder to reach up and whack the lowest tubes.”

Many area residents will recall that the cinema closed in 2000 and was dark for almost five years. A ceremony took place when the marquee was relit and Bill Zimmerman made a big prop switch outside on the sidewalk, which Mayor Bob Stead pulled to “relight the marquee”.

The theatre building goes back in 1911. The brick façade was extensively renovated last year after the provincial heritage designation was approved. The marquee is listed as one of cinema’s character defining elements.

Photo: Steven Slipp

Categories
Articles Events Film & Media Look

2018-2019 Metropolitan Opera Live Stream Series

2018-2019 Metropolitan Opera Live Stream Series
By Margot Bishop

Are you an opera buff? Whatever your level of love for opera, you will have a real treat in store with the HD live stream series from the Met in New York city. There are six operas this season still to be shown at the Cineplex in New Minas.

Revivals:

Bizet’s Carmen (Feb 2)

Donizetti’s La Fille du Regiment (March 2)

Wagner’s Die Walkure (March 30)

Poulenc’s Dialogues des Carmelites (May 11)

New Productions:

Cilea’s Adriana Lecouvreur (Jan 12)

When you go to the Met or another opera house, you see and hear the performance, as a member of the audience. When you go to the live stream HD performance at Cineplex, you see so much more.

You get to watch the scene changes between acts, rehearsals in other parts of the Met, visit other departments (costumes, archives), and even get to meet animal handlers. Operas like Aida have various animals, which have to audition for their parts, just like human characters.

What is really interesting is that not only are the principals interviewed but members of the chorus are introduced and tell us about their roles. If there are fight scenes, then the fight co-ordinator tells us the tricks of that trade. You even get tidbits of facts and history (did you know that the French opera companies would not stage a production unless there was a ballet sequence in it?)

This is a great season at the Met. If you have never been to an opera but have sometimes thought that it might be fun to see one, go to the Cineplex live stream HD transmissions from the Met, it is truly a great experience.

Categories
Articles Events Film & Media Look

Al Whittle Theatre Screens Beloved Holiday Films December 17-22

Al Whittle Theatre Screens Beloved Holiday Films December 17-22

Following the success of their Retro Blockbuster summer film series, the Acadia Cinema Co-op will present a week of fun, holiday-themed films this December at the Al Whittle Theatre in Wolfville. You may have seen these seasonal favourites before, but now is your chance to see them on the big screen! Tickets are only $5, so take your whole family, bring a group of friends, or treat your co-workers. Celebrate the season of giving by choosing cinema tickets as a gift for party guests, or as an advent calendar surprise! Grab some popcorn and a hot chocolate, and settle in for a cozy evening at the theatre with these cinematic treasures:

Monday, December 17 (7pm): The series kicks off with the musical White Christmas (1954), in which a pair of successful song-and-dance showmen (Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye) team up with a sister act (Rosemary Clooney, Vera Ellen) to save a failing inn in Vermont.

Tuesday, December 18 (7pm): Home Alone (1990) is a slapstick comedy about an eight-year-old troublemaker (Macaulay Culkin) who must protect his house from a pair of burglars (Joe Pesci, Daniel Stern) when he is accidentally left behind by his family during Christmas vacation.

Wednesday, December 19 (7pm): Rotten Tomatoes calls It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) the “holiday classic to define all holiday classics.” The story follows a compassionate but desperately frustrated small-town businessman (James Stewart) in an encounter with an affable angel (Henry Travers), who shows him what life would have been like if he had never existed.

Thursday, December 20 (7pm): In the goofball family favourite A Christmas Story (1983), a young boy (Peter Billingsley) attempts to convince his parents, his teacher, and Santa that a Red Ryder BB gun really is the perfect Christmas gift.

Friday, December 21 (7pm): What’s Christmas without a little action? In Die Hard (1998), seasoned cop John McClane (Bruce Willis) dodges bombs and bullets in order to save his ex-wife (Bonnie Bedelia) from a greedy terrorist (Alan Rickman) after she and others are taken hostage during a high-rise office Christmas party in Los Angeles.

Saturday, December 22 (2pm): Perfect for cinephiles with earlier bedtimes! This double-header matinee kicks off with How the Grinch Stole Christmas (1966), an animated short based on the beloved Dr. Seuss book and narrated by Boris Karloff. After a quick break the fun continues with Elf, (2003) starring Will Farrell as a human raised by Santa’s elves who must leave his North Pole home to search for his real father (James Caan) in modern-day New York.

Tickets are available at the door or in advance at Just Us! Café in Wolfville. This film series is made possible with support from the Wolfville Business Development Corporation. Visit alwhittletheatre.ca or follow us on Facebook or Instagram to learn more!

Categories
Articles Events Film & Media Look

Aube Giroux’s Modified to be Screened at Kings County Museum

Aube Giroux’s Modified to be Screened at Kings County Museum
By Wendy Elliott

October is non-GMO month, and the moving documentary Modified will be screened October 22 at the Kings County Museum in Kentville. That’s prior to its screening at the Seoul International Film Festival in Korea. Modified recently received its ninth festival award at Green Screen International Wildlife Film Festival in Germany.

Filmmaker Aube Giroux, who grew up in the Valley, lived in Europe for two years where genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are labelled on food products, and recalls coming home and feeling frustrated that they weren’t clearly identified on this continent. Her frustration grew learning that over 80 per cent of Canadians and Americans want GMO labeling. “The more we looked into it, the more it seemed that industry was calling the shots when it came to policies around GMOs.”

Giroux had always imagined the film would begin in her mother Jali’s lush garden, where their shared love of food and cooking came from, “but after she was diagnosed with brain cancer two years into the film’s production, the film unexpectedly became more personal and intimate than I had originally envisioned. It became a tribute to my mom’s deep love of gardening and cooking, and to her firm belief that we all have a right to know how our food is produced.”

Modified was sold out when it screened last year in Wolfville. Questioning why Canada does not label GMOs is pretty important, especially when you see Giroux held up by red tape. Audience members watch her calling Health Canada month after month trying to pose her questions. Giroux wanted to find out why Canada has refused to label GMOs since their introduction 20 years ago, and 64 countries around the world already require that GMOs be labeled in food products. Canadian taxpayers should know what their government is doing to regulate food, Giroux says. Giroux spent the past decade or so documenting the grassroots battle around GMO labelling on this continent. She brings her personal and family passion to the project.

A private member’s bill that would have required a label to sell “any food that is genetically modified” was defeated in the House of Commons. Quebec NDP MP Pierre-Luc Dusseault introduced the draft legislation, which was supported by just 67 MPs. The majority of the Liberal caucus and all Conservative MPs voted against it.

Modified goes a long way to expose the cozy relationship between the biotech industry and government. It is anchored in a caring mother who died of cancer during the film’s production. Giroux almost gave up the project, but then found herself re-invigorated.

The film’s release came just one month after the announcement that five tons of GM salmon had been sold in Canada. Canada is the first country in the world to sell a GM animal for human consumption.

This documentary proves that Canadians deserve a more transparent and sustainable food system. If over 60 other countries can offer their citizens better information about what they eat, why can’t this one?

The screening in Kentville is set for 6pm.

Categories
Articles Dinner Out Eat/Drink Events Film & Media Look

Dinner Out: Scott’s Top Devour! Picks

Dinner Out: Scott’s Top Devour! Picks
By Scott Campbell

It’s fall in the Valley and that means two things: Harvest and the Devour! Food Film Festival. And, although both are exciting and food-based, only one brings with it a buffet of mouthwatering servings of fresh feature films. As I excitedly pored over the film offerings this year I concluded, again, that I wanted to see them all. But, if you can only manage to squeeze a few into your schedule, here are some that I think look intriguing.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi
USA, 2011, 81 minutes
Director David Gelb

85-year-old Jiro Ono is considered by many to be the world’s greatest sushi chef. He is the proprietor of Sukiyabashi Jiro, a 10-seat, sushi-only restaurant inauspiciously located in a Tokyo subway station. Despite its humble appearances, it is the first restaurant of its kind to be awarded a prestigious three-star Michelin Guide rating, and sushi lovers from around the globe make repeated pilgrimages, calling months in advance, and shelling out top dollar for a coveted seat at Jiro’s sushi bar. A thoughtful and elegant meditation on work, family, and the art of perfection, chronicling Jiro’s life as both an unparalleled success in the culinary world and as a loving yet complicated father.

Our Blood is Wine
USA, 2018, 78 minutes
Director Emily Railsback

Since time immemorial, the country of Georgia has produced some of the rarest and most sought after wines in the world. Some of us may recall a certain wine maker named Bastienne who worked at Benjamin Bridge winery for several years. Bastienne now makes wine in Georgia, so I was intrigued to get a closer look at the industry there.

Lightfoot and Wolfville
Canada, 2018, 5 minutes
Directors The Perennial Plate

A family reclaims its once lost land and makes biodynamic wine with the pull of the world’s largest tide cycle. Any of us who are fans of the magnificent Lightfoot and Wolfville Winery will be sure to be enchanted with this great short film.

 

A Rising Tide
Canada, 2018, 9 minutes
Directors The Perennial Plate

Lobster is the lifeblood of many Nova Scotia fishing communities, where the world’s largest tides dictate the daily catch.

 

 

André – The Voice of Wine
USA/Germany, 2016, 98 minutes
Director Mark Tchelistcheff

André Tchelistcheff arguably invented California wine as we know it today. Told in his own voice, the history of winemaking in America comes to life in this touching feature documentary from André’s own grand-nephew, director Mark Tchelistcheff.

These are just a few of the films that stood out for me as I perused the schedule. There were certainly others I thought looked amazing – too many to list here – so I’d encourage everyone to get out and take in this fantastic opportunity to see some of the most engaging culinary cinematographic works in the world. Cheers.

Follow Scott on Twitter or Instagram@ScottsGrapevine

Categories
Articles Events Film & Media Look

The Women of Wolfville are Ready to Celebrate Care Giving

The Women of Wolfville are Ready to Celebrate Care Giving
By Wendy Elliott

The Wolfville of Wolfville (WOW) believe that caring connects everyone.
The town’s unique community theatre group has built its 15th annual collective creation, Got Your Back!, on the theme of care giving.

“Care giving embodies kindness and empathy, which are both at the core of the human experience,” says Acadia University student Alisha Christie.
Christie is one of five community development students that have joined the WOW network of over 300 women across the Valley.

Actor and writer Gail Salmon says, “we all forget that caring is a way of life. Caring can be as small as not laughing at someone’s misfortune or saying something hurtful.”

“To many,” adds Oonagh Proudfoot, “care giving comes naturally,” but she adds, “celebrating it through this show will hopefully help us all reflect on and value it.”

Twenty-five WOW members, ranging in age from five to 65, have been preparing for several months for the production that hits the stage April 6 and 7.

Director Linda Wheeldon says the production will be full of storytelling, song, and dance. The cast will be joined by Wolfville’s new community choir, Our Tunes, which is directed by Heather Price.

Among the themes that WOW has looked at over the last decade and a half are: body image, hope, mothering, food and local history.

Got Your Back! will be staged at the Al Whittle Theatre in Wolfville. There will be three performances. The evening shows are at 7:30pm and the Saturday matinee starts at 2pm.

Proceeds from this year’s production will help several charities. Through their annual theatrical adventures, WOW has raised over $185,000 for charity since its first show, Vagina Monologues, in 2002.

Tickets for this year’s production are $12 students/seniors and $15 for adults. They are available at The Box of Delights Bookshop in Wolfville or at the door.