Author Archive: Genevieve Allen Hearn

Get Outside: Maritime Dog First Aid and Hiking Safety

Emily Kathan Tracey Buchanan is the owner and operator of Maritime Dog First Aid and Hiking Safety. She also teaches (human) first aid courses for BraveHeart First Aid in Coldbrook. Owning a dog (or two) means getting outside is part of your daily routine. We asked Tracey about how her training courses and hikes help dogs and their people stay safe and healthy while exploring and enjoying trails around the Valley: The Grapevine: Tell our readers a little about yourself and where you’re from (and a little about your dogs too!):Tracey Buchanan: I grew up in Baddeck, Cape Breton, and…
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Who’s Who: Stephanie Battams A Cut Above the Rest!

Mike Butler I love puns, and I will try my best not to fill this Who’s Who article with puns! That’s my disclaimer as I navigate telling you about a gem of a local. This wonderful woman is a shear delight and I am honoured to finally feature her hair…I mean HERE! It’s early in the article, trust me, the hair puns will make sense soon! Stephanie Battams was born and raised in Calgary (those are her roots), attained a cosmetology license while in high school, and then moved to Nova Scotia with her five-year-old daughter on a leap of…
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Featurepreneur: An Entrepreneurial Buffet

Genevieve Allen Hearn One would think that the tail-end of a global pandemic is a precarious time to open a new restaurant, but then again, not everyone has a record of success like Chef Jason Lynch. Head chef at Le Caveau in Grand-Pré, owner of The Black Spruce restaurant in Gros Morne National Park, creator of a line of preserves, writer of the cookbook Straight From the Line, and producer of a podcast series, Jason Lynch is the entrepreneur equivalent of a turducken. His newest project is Cumin Kitchen and Drink, an “urban café and eatery” located in the Valley…
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Local Books: The Flower Cart Project

Wendy Elliott New Minas writer Jim Prime has collected the 50-year history of The Flower Cart ahead of a new departure for this vital social enterprise organization. It’s important to remember the past before moving into a new era. That is what Work with Purpose: 50 years of Supported Employment and Training in the Annapolis Valley provides. The book celebrates a community-driven history that began with the late Jean DeWolfe of Wolfville wanting a fulfilling life for her daughter, Linda, who was born with Down syndrome. She gathered some friends together in 1970. They conceived the notion of a sheltered…
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An ‘Unpredictable Dining’ Experience

Mike Butler After a very unpredictable 2020, I have decided to take life by the reigns and make sure that 2021 is as enjoyable as I can make it. We have many limitations and restrictions in place right now keeping us safe and I am so proud of how we’ve managed through this unpredictable time. Follow the rules and find your fun everyone! Recently, for the first time, my husband and I took part in an Unpredictable Dining Experience, and it was, as I predicted, one of the most enjoyable evenings we’ve had together. If you’ve lived in the Valley…
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West Brooklyn SpeakEasy Becomes the Place to Play on Saturday Nights

Ruth Legge Two years ago, the West Brooklyn Community Hall was looking to expand its variety of activities. The Jill Hiscock group, whose drummer lives in West Brooklyn, needed a rehearsal and performance space. Along with a band of volunteers, the SpeakEasy was born. A 1920s jazz vibe combined with tasty food, local craft beers, original cocktails, great acoustics, and a steady audience combined to make it a low key success every Saturday night. Then the world changed. After a break during the shut down, the SpeakEasy became one of the few venues open, due to our low numbers and…
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Transition Wolfville Area’s Poetry Project

LocaVisions and Alter-narratives to Seed our Near Good FutureSubmitted by Transition Wolfville Area It’s been a year of emergency measures, lockdowns, and increased general anxiety. We have all had some time to reflect on the state of human affairs on our precious planet. Transition Wolfville Area is excited to embrace the promise of spring renewal. We are promoting a people-powered and physical “Local Visioning” project in poetic form this April. April is national poetry month with Earth Day at its core on the 21st. In Wolfville, this will be celebrated as Earth Week. This project invites us all to dream…
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New Music: The Basin Brothers Release Two Albums

Submitted “It’s been a pretty strange year for sure,” says Basin Brother Chase Ross, but, he continues, “it has been a good time to focus on crafting new songs, and to record two new albums.” Now, those albums are here. Furthest Out and Thinking Of You are full of the types of songs The Basin Brothers have become known for, exploring themes like introspection, love, heartache, and trying to get by. Both albums were produced by Thomas Stajcer at New Scotland Yard Studio in Dartmouth. “The recordings,” says Ross, “show a broader musicality, dynamics, and re-thinking of what our strengths…
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Nova Scotia’s Natural Ice Season

Joel Hornborg, Nor’Easter Natural Ice Our winters are definitely changing. Drastic temperature fluctuations throughout the season have made it increasingly challenging to plan ahead for winter adventures, and it is rare that good snow or ice conditions last for more than a few days. Luckily, you usually don’t have to wait very long before the next window of great conditions returns. Nordic skates, kicksleds, fat bikes, skis, and snowshoes are all useful tools to have ready in your quiver. For those prepared with the right equipment and knowledge of conditions, winters are filled with opportunities for incredible adventures in frozen…
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Wolfville’s Al Whittle Theatre Needs Love

Wendy Elliott The Al Whittle Theatre in Wolfville is very much alive, even though there have been no public performances and almost zero income for the past 12 months.Fortunately there have been some private rentals and support from the provincial government, so Mary Harwell, manager of Wolfville’s cultural hub, says, “we’re not in danger, but revenues are down a lot.” An emergency funding grant of $19,715 will help the facility to continue to host concerts, film screenings, live theatre, and festivals once pandemic restrictions ease. The cinema had a program of improvements underway, Harwell noted, but refurbishing of brickwork on…
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